Newberry Interviewed on Romantic Art and Philosophy, 1hr-20min

Yesterday the good people at the Ayn Rand Fan Club invited me to talk about art, living abroad, aesthetics, and Rand

Scott Schiff and William Swig, smart guys, discuss with me art, Rand, and PsyOp. You will come away with deeper understanding of:

How the windy atmosphere of Saint-Rémy-de-Provence, would have been a key perceptual influence on Van Gogh’s wavy brush strokes.

Van Gogh’s innovation of flipping traditional color theory.

Leaving tennis for art. And recalling a genius shot while playing a doubles match with 12-year-old Pete Sampras.

My color theory from the Wave Series.We cover my paintings Winter, Icarus Landing, and current work-in-progress Danae. And issues working with photographs. How I created spatial depth in the painting Winter. Fingers and toes being the exclamation points of the figure. The moral behind Icarus Landing, and going after your dreams. And the freedom of creators to change legends to their own ends.

We talk about the interpretations of the myth of Danae from the Ancient Greek stories to Rembrandt improving on the legend, to my take. And how I used erotic symbolism in the painting.

The knowledge of forms, light, composition, benevolent feelings in the nature of art, and how postmodernists attempt to eliminate everything that is good in art—true anti-artists.

We discuss how Immanuel Kant established the intellectual framework that enabled postmodernism. All which is enabled by good people being naive about it. The answer to postmodernist art is two-fold: one is understanding the fundamentals of real art (form, light, and depth) are axiomatic; and two is understanding their weak psychological stances.

Lastly we discuss how light is the zenith of painting and my upcoming modern mythology painting projects.

Frame of References:

Aristotle, The Nicomachean Ethics. A wonderful survey of the meaning of life from perhaps the wisest man that ever existed. “Every art and every kind of inquiry, and likewise every act and purpose, seems to aim at some good: and so it has been well said that the good is that at which everything aims.” https://oll.libertyfund.org/title/peters-the-nicomachean-ethics

Ayn Rand Fan Club on YouTube. Scott Schiff and William Swig team up to interview some of today’s leading intellectuals and authors such as Robert Bidinotto, James Valliant, Stephen Hicks, David Kelley. Less than a year old their project is shaping up to have a stellar future. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIwnFth-NfBpdMjrvNFKVyA/videos

Burke, Edmund. Not many people know they Kant was highly influenced by 19-year-old Edmund Burke’s A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful. https://www.gutenberg.org/files/15043/15043-h/15043-h.htm#A_PHILOSOPHICAL_INQUIRY

Burke, Edmund. I offer an alternative take on Burke in my book Evolution Through Art, which hypnotizes that the teenager was taking the piss out of his professors and Aristotle. As well as a chapter Kant’s aesthetics of the sublime. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B095MGMQV7/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_taft_p1_i3

Eudaemonia., Wikipedia article on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eudaimonia

Kant, Immanuel. Kant’s aesthetic is perhaps the most influential treatise of 20th century art, leading to hopelessly nihilistic postmodern culture we have today. Kant is widely mentioned on the Tate’s website, which gives you an idea how he is esteemed by the postmodernists: https://www.tate.org.uk/search?q=Kant&op=Search&form_id=search_block_form

Rand, Ayn. Author of Atlas Shrugged, here she has some pithy takes on art. http://aynrandlexicon.com/lexicon/art.html

Rembrandt, van Rijn. Image of his Danae: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dana%C3%AB_(Rembrandt_painting)#/media/File:Rembrandt_Harmensz._van_Rijn_026.jpg

Sampras, Pete. One of the all time tennis greats that I had the pleasure of giving him over 40 tennis lessons (tennis was my part-time job in my early adulthood) when he was between 11-13 years old. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pete_Sampras

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