TOMBS 3: Yale School of Art by Michael Newberry

Martha Kuzma, Dean of Yale School of Art

The crime against the human spirit is when you give incompetents, who cannot draw their way out of a paper bag, positions of educating young artists. I used to think of Yale and Harvard as two great American Universities. Now, no longer. When I see those names all I can think of is TOMBS: Termination of mind, body, and soul.

The problem is to be free in art, to express anything, you have to master it. The lessor the skills the more you are confined to a prison of rage, frustration, and hopelessness. Looking at art from artists with no skills is like watching a deaf, blind, and mute person try to communicate. Giving them the job of spiritual communication is unconscionable.

They say their motive to give artists freedom to do anything they want and to be original. But if you look at the works of these faculty members — none of them are original. But the worst part, they cannot communicate anything of mental, emotional, or sensory value (we can quibble over some partial exceptions).

There is a small chance that these people know nothing. But what is more likely is that they have embraced self-immobilization and the need to inflict immobilization on innocents and to do everything they can to squash value in art and artists. Prick an envy and rage-filled incompetent and you get a spiritual dictator that must control masses through malfeasance.

If you are a parent or grandparent sending your children to these types of schools, you are defaulting on your job to help evolve your kids. You are not a good person.

Michael Newberry, Idyllwild, 5/24/2020

Update on Evolution Through Art

Akhenaten
Akhenaten
Akhenaten

Celebrating a little bit tonight, lol, with a cup of coffee. I finished Part One of my inaugural attempt at a book. Already been copy edited, thumps up. Finished are the Intro plus 6 chapters, and 17,000 words. Some of the ground will be familiar to artists and art historians, but I hope it will make deep inroads in the psychology of art and give sense of these artists being alive and transcending time.

This is one of the paragraphs from the 3rd Chapter, Trepidation, Art is Not Tangible and Yet …

The early artist would have been shifting valuable efforts away from life-sustaining work towards the abstract pursuit of art. All animals engage in life-sustaining action, but it would appear as if  the artist was rejecting this. Visual art, then as now, has no utilitarian purpose, none whatsoever. Art could not mend things, carve arrows, and build fires. It was not a tool. It did not give warmth, shelter, food, or security. In practical terms it was useless. Diverting resources for such an senseless art adventure would be perceived as a psychosis, the artist having a partial or total break with reality.

Continue reading “Update on Evolution Through Art”

Where No Mind Had Gone Before

Evolution Through Art by Michael Newberry
Evolution Through Art by Michael Newberry
Da Vinci’s angel on the left, and his mentor, Verrocchio’s on the right.

Progressing on my book Evolution Through Art, past the 10k in words, now in the middle of the 5th chapter, The Wizards. Here is a snippet:

For the artists that didn’t turn away they would have to cope with, defend, and manage resentment. For their art they would breath deep, fortify themselves, and let go of certainty and control and dive into a vast alternative universe; exploring where no mind had gone before.

Michael Newberry, Idyllwild, 4/4/2020